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Temples & Legends of Bengal
Index Of Bengal Kulapati's Preface
Preface Author
The Kalighat Temple of Calcutta Ram Krishna Mission Temples
The Temples in Burdwan The Temples in Hooghly
The Temples in Twenty four Parganas The Temples in Midnapore
The Temples in Birbhum Ektesvara - Siva Temple
The Temples In Bankura Jain Temples In Purulia
Kapilmuni Temple at Sagar Island A Chinese Temple
The Tibetan Temple At Bhotbagan Kiriteswari   Temple
Bhattamati Temple  
Major Sections
Temples & Legends Of India
Andhrapradesh
Maharastra
Kerala
Himachal Pradesh
Tamilnadu

Bengal

Assam
Bihar
Somanatha

THE TEMPLES IN HOOGHLY

During the Rath-jatra festival the image is placed on the car, and the crowd draws the car to the God's garden-house to the north of Mahesh. After eight days, on the Ulta-rath day, the car with the image is drawn back to its old place, when the image is carried to the temple.Mahesh is an old place mentioned in the poem of Bipra Das (1495 A.D.) and in the poem on the legend of Satyanarayana (18thcentury). But the cult of Jagannath is easily older. The Oriya kings once had ruled this part of the country and it is quite obvious that the cult of Jagannath was introduced then.

Thousands of pilgrims from Calcutta side used to walk by the pilgrim Road to Puri for a darshan of Jagannath there and the receptivity for adopting Jagannath cult was easily created in Bengal.The same festivals observed in the Jagannath temple at Puri are celebrated at Mahesh.Guptipara is a large village in thana Balagarh of the Hooghly subdivision, in the extreme north- east of the district, situated about 1 and half miles west of the Right Bank of Hooghly. Guptapara 4 was a well-known place in the 18th century. "Guptipara" is shown in the map of Stavorinus (circa 1770A.D.), but on the left bank of the river. This, if correct, indicates an older site; for in the Bengali poems of the 18th century, the village is distinctly mentioned as being on the Right Bank. 5 

The former importance of the place is still attested by the number of Brahmans and Baidyas residing in it, and by its temple and religious fairs. The Revd. J. Long in 1846 remarked; "On the opposite of the rive (i.e. right bank) is Guptapara, the people of which are famous for theiractivity and wit and the purity of their Bengali:there are 15 tolas (tols) and many Pandits who study the Nyaya Shastra (sic); it is also notorious for thieves and Brahmans.


4 Bengal District Gazetteers, Hooghly, by L.S.S. O'Malley, Calcutta, 1912, pp. 261-263.

5 Satyanarayaner Katha, Shaitya-Parishad Patrika, vol. VIII, p.63; Chandrakanta, Do.vol.X, p.130.

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Temples & Legends Of Bengal.
About Temples In Hooghly
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