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Khandoba




Page: 12/34

Hindu Books > Temples And Legends of India > Temples And Legends Of Maharastra > Khandoba

Khandoba Temple, Jejuri : General View Page11

Now are to be narrated some practices with are either of a barbaric-aghori-nature or have affected the social structure to a considerable degree. Some years ago it was a custom to walk across a trench full of red-hot burning charcoal. A more horrible custom was to bang from a tall pole with a pointed book thrust in the back. This must have been an extremely painful procedure and a still more horrible scene to witness.

This custom has been prevented by law now, although huge poles, chains and hooks still are seen in the vicinity of the temple. the grim relics of a bygone age. These customs horrible as they were did not affect the overall social fabric, But the custom of offering the child, born of a navas, to the service of the god had the most far reaching consequences, These children had to spend their entire lives in ‘temple’ service. The made children were known as Vaghes while the female ones were known as Muralis. Out of these, the custom of offering a child as a vaghya still continues but the custom of turning children into Muralis is now forbidden by law. in keeping with the nature of the Hindu society, very soon these vagheas and muralis were treated as a separate social caste group.




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